Enjoy the present

I’ve just been seeing post after post about how nasty 2016 has been in killing off great people. Here’s something to consider: death is a part of life. You can’t have one without the other.

My thoughts are quite simple on this matter, and below is what I posted to facebook earlier:

I will never be able to match some of you on the level of your sadness, nostalgia or memories when the passing of someone from your past (real, actor, singer or character [based on recent announcements]), however I want you to remember those around you and in your lives right now that you should also be thinking of – those who you will likely mourn or grieve when the time comes. Think of them now, call them or message them and tell them so. Otherwise they too will disappear from view, most likely ‘too soon’. Do it now. Tell them how much they mean to you – happy for you to do so in the comments below

OP: https://www.facebook.com/AndrewBlanda/posts/10154964522188010

You are who you listen to

I have been fortunate to enjoy a number of podcasts in my helmet as I ride to work each day. My standard Playlist revolves through Tim Ferris, James Altucher, Freakonomics and Good Job Brain.

I have found a lethal combination of interviewer/interviewee and have truly revelled in the banter and discussion that has transpired between them. This is Part 1 of my “You are who you listen to” posts.

I’ve been listening to Tim Ferris for a while now and love how he’s able to perfect his questions, drill down deep into various topics, keeping the content of his podcasts vibrant and ever changing whilst at the same time anchoring the interview with some of his standard questions, interjected throughout the podcast. One of the best interviews to listen to was one of his most recent – his (follow-up) interview with Tony Robbins.

Tim Ferris and Tony Robbins in my helmet whilst riding to/from work each day is not for the faint-hearted. I was grinning and shouting in my helmet (to myself, of course) whilst commuting at a fairly brisk pace, often getting lost in the conversation not realising how fast I may be going at a particular point. The dialogue and mutual respect for each other (which is an important part of any conversation, professional or personal) is a joy to listen to and one from which many people can learn.

By far this is the best Tim Ferriss podcast I have had the listening pleasure to partake in. I want to live my life even half as well as Tim and Tony, and my goal is to follow their teachings whilst carving my own path through life. If I’m half as successful as they are, we’re onto something ūüôā

What have I learned?

  • Gratitude is everything.
  • Self is important as long as it’s to ground you and ensure you’re in a position to be ready to take up the challenges on behalf of of those who cannot. You cannot give yourself when you are not in a position mentally, physically or spiritually. You owe it to yourself to have these in alignment so you can then help others.
  • I believe in the Stoic philosophy (although I am not yet up with all the teachings, I certainly believe in the tenets of it). I practice it in everyday life, I see everything as an opportunity to do better and to reach a stage where I, too can teach this to others.
  • Tim goes deep in almost everything he tries. Tony goes deep both personally and with those who seek his guidance or counsel. I go deep into things, but not in the same way as Tim or Tony. Depth is good but I need to learn to go just deep enough to achieve the results and not try and find the lower depths, lest I wallow there too long. Life is short and there’s a lot to it to be exploring.
  • Learn something new every day – I believe you can learn something from everyone you meet and interact with, as long as you are willing to invest some time to hear their story, listen to their counsel or tap into their ideas.

Until next time, look after yourself and keep focusing on what you can do to become better; be better and share your story!

 

Film score

I listened to the Jason Silva interview today whilst commuting, and a couple of things jumped out at me that I’d not thought of before – how powerful the musical score is from a movie.

I’d come home determined to watch Inception tonight (one of Jason Silva’s favourite movies), however could not find it on Netflix – but chanced upon a documentary instead called A Faster Horse (about the Ford Mustang). I decided to watch it as it’s been launched in Australia recently, and being a closet car-nut (closet as in I¬†secretly read up on cars and dream about owing many of them but cannot extend the love into reality), I watched.

The one thing that seemed to have pervaded the story, as well as my subconscious was the¬†music that accompanied the show. I’ve not noticed the score in many movies in the past but because it was something I’d come across recently¬†from the podcast, I was obviously primed enough to¬†notice it.

Listening to great people like Jason Silva (and partaking in watching a few episodes of Brain Games recently), is a great way to learn more about the world, as well as learning more about yourself. I highly recommend the podcast series to you.